Resources

Information and tools to keep you informed, prepared, and confident

Watch videos and read stories about parents just like you, tap into an extended community of RSV experts and advocates, and find helpful links, answers, and more.

Videos for parents like you

Knowing about severe RSV and how to help protect your high-risk baby is important. It's also good to know you're not the only one going through this.

Learn more about RSV disease and how SYNAGIS can help protect your baby

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Audrey’s story: A family’s struggle with RSV and coverage denial

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Jessica’s story: A mom who benefited from Cradle with CareSM

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Downloads for parents

Downloads for SYNAGIS

Learn more about how SYNAGIS may help your baby (PDF)

RSV Downloads

Educate yourself about RSV, SYNAGIS, and why your baby may be at high risk

Frequently asked questions

When it comes to your baby's health, every parent has questions. You’ll find answers to commonly asked questions about SYNAGIS and RSV below. But remember, it’s always a good idea to talk to your doctor about SYNAGIS and your baby's health first.

Is SYNAGIS a vaccine?

No. SYNAGIS [si-nah-jis] is an FDA-approved prescription injection of antibodies that is given monthly to help protect high-risk infants from severe RSV disease throughout the RSV season. Each dose provides protection for about 28–30 days.

How many injections of SYNAGIS will my baby need?

Your child's healthcare provider will give you detailed instructions on when SYNAGIS will be given. SYNAGIS is needed every 28-30 days during the RSV season. Each injection of SYNAGIS helps protect your child from severe RSV disease for about 1 month.

My high-risk baby looks healthy. Are monthly injections of SYNAGIS still necessary?

Yes. No matter how your baby looks, they may still be at high risk for severe RSV disease. Your doctor will tell you when RSV season has ended and your baby can stop their monthly injections of SYNAGIS.

What should I do if my insurance won't cover SYNAGIS?

While many health plans cover SYNAGIS, coverage levels and the requirements for getting it can vary. If you're denied coverage or have questions about insurance, Access 360™ may be able to help.
Call 1-877-778-9010 to hear about different financial support programs that you may be able to use.

Will my high-risk baby need SYNAGIS for a second RSV season?

Most high-risk babies won't need SYNAGIS for a second season. But babies who remain high risk for severe RSV disease in their second year may need SYNAGIS for more than one RSV season. Ask your doctor if your baby will need SYNAGIS for a second season.

How do I stay on track with appointments?

Many parents just like you have benefited from the appointment reminders and support offered by Cradle with Care, a program designed to help you and your baby throughout the RSV season.

What is RSV?

RSV is a seasonal respiratory virus that is easily spread and typically causes mild to moderate cold-like symptoms. But in certain high-risk children, it can cause a serious lung infection.

What is an RSV infection?

RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lungs) and/or pneumonia in children under 1 year of age in the US. In fact, almost all children get RSV before they turn 2 years old.

Learn more about RSV infection >

Is my baby at high risk for severe RSV disease?

Babies born prematurely at 35 weeks or less and children 24 months or younger with certain heart or lung conditions are at high risk for severe RSV disease. In these babies, RSV can lead to hospitalization due to serious lung infections such as bronchiolitis and/or pneumonia.

What is RSV season?

Like the flu, RSV is a seasonal virus. The season varies from one part of the country to the next, but usually starts in fall and continues into spring. In some states such as Alaska, Hawaii, and parts of Texas and Florida, for example, the length of the RSV season may be different. To find out when RSV season starts in your area, talk to your baby's doctor.

How serious is RSV?

Most children with RSV disease suffer only mild to moderate cold-like symptoms. But for some high-risk babies, RSV disease can be more severe. Infants born at 35 weeks or less and children 24 months or younger with certain heart or lung conditions are at high risk for serious lung infections such as bronchiolitis and/or pneumonia.

What are the signs and symptoms of a severe RSV infection?

Some signs and symptoms of severe RSV disease include:

  • Coughing or wheezing that does not stop
  • Fast or troubled breathing
  • A bluish color around the mouth or fingernails
  • Spread-out nostrils and/or a caved-in chest when trying to breathe
  • Gasping for breath

How easy is it to catch RSV?

Like the flu, RSV can be spread by sneezing, coughing or physical contact, such as touching or shaking hands. RSV can live up to 7 hours on countertops and other surfaces. It can spread very quickly in daycare centers and crowded households. As a result, nearly all babies get RSV disease by the age of 2.

What could put my baby at risk for severe RSV disease?

Here are some of the main factors that can increase your baby's risk for severe RSV disease:

  • Premature birth: Infants who are born prematurely (born at 35 weeks or less), and who are 6 months of age or younger at the beginning of RSV season
  • Chronic lung disease: Infants who have a lung condition known as BPD/CLDP (bronchopulmonary dysplasia/chronic lung disease of prematurity) that required medical treatment within the previous 6 months, and who are 24 months of age or younger at the beginning of RSV season
  • Heart disease: Infants who have a heart condition known as HS-CHD (hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease), and who are 24 months of age or younger at the beginning of RSV season

Additional risk factors for premature infants may include:

  • Young chronological age (≤12 weeks of age at the start of RSV season)
  • Pre-school or school-aged sibling(s)
  • Daycare attendance
  • Living with 4 or more family members
  • Family history of wheezing or asthma
  • Exposure to tobacco smoke—never let anyone smoke around your baby
  • Multiple births—twins, triplets, and other multiples are often premature and have a low birth weight
  • Severe disease of muscles or nerves
  • Abnormal airways at birth

Can my baby get RSV more than once?

Yes. RSV is a virus, and just like some other viruses, it is possible for your baby to get RSV disease more than once. After each RSV infection, your baby may become more immune to the virus, but he or she is never completely immune.

There are many preventive measures that you can do to help ensure your baby doesn't get it again.

Learn more >

Is there a cure for RSV disease?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for RSV disease. However, there are several preventive measures you can use to help protect your baby.

Learn more >

Can my baby get RSV in the womb?

No. Your baby cannot get RSV until he or she is born.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

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Who should not receive SYNAGIS?

Children should not receive SYNAGIS if they have ever had a severe allergic reaction to it. Signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction could include itchy rash; swelling of the face; difficulty swallowing; difficulty breathing; bluish color of the skin; muscle weakness or floppiness; and/or unresponsiveness. If your child has any of these signs or symptoms of a severe allergic reaction after getting SYNAGIS, call your child’s healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Who should not receive SYNAGIS?

Children should not receive SYNAGIS if they have ever had a severe allergic reaction to it. Signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction could include itchy rash; swelling of the face; difficulty swallowing; difficulty breathing; bluish color of the skin; muscle weakness or floppiness; and/or unresponsiveness. If your child has any of these signs or symptoms of a severe allergic reaction after getting SYNAGIS, call your child’s healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

How is SYNAGIS given?

SYNAGIS is given as a monthly injection, usually in the thigh (leg) muscle, by your child’s healthcare provider. If your child has a problem with bleeding or bruises easily, an injection could cause a problem. Your child should receive their first injection of SYNAGIS before the RSV season starts, to help protect them before RSV becomes active. RSV season is usually fall through spring, but it may begin earlier or last longer in certain areas. When RSV is most active, your child will need to receive injections of SYNAGIS every 28-30 days to help protect them from severe RSV disease for about a month. Your child should continue to receive monthly injections of SYNAGIS until the end of RSV season. Your child may still get severe RSV disease after receiving SYNAGIS. If your child has an RSV infection, they should continue to get their monthly injections throughout the RSV season to help prevent severe disease from new RSV infections.

The effectiveness of injections of SYNAGIS given less than monthly throughout the RSV season has not been established.

What are the possible side effects of SYNAGIS?

Serious side effects include severe allergic reactions, which may happen after any injection of SYNAGIS and may be life-threatening or cause death. Call your child’s healthcare provider or get medical help right away if your child has any of the signs or symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. See “Who should not receive SYNAGIS?” for more information.

Common side effects of SYNAGIS include fever and rash.

These are not all the possible side effects of SYNAGIS.

APPROVED USE

SYNAGIS is a prescription medication that is used to help prevent a serious lung disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children:

  • born prematurely (at or before 35 weeks) and who are 6 months of age or less at the beginning of RSV season
  • who have a chronic lung condition called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), that needed medical treatment within the last 6 months, and who are 24 months of age or less at the beginning of RSV season
  • born with certain types of heart disease and who are 24 months of age or less at the beginning of RSV season

It is not known if SYNAGIS is safe and effective:

  • to treat the symptoms of RSV in a child who already has RSV. SYNAGIS is used to help prevent RSV disease
  • in children who are older than 24 months of age at the start of dosing

Please see full Prescribing Information for SYNAGIS, including Patient Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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